What To Expect at Your Appointment

When to Arrive for Your Exam
Please arrive 15 minutes prior to your exam start time. If you are to receive oral or intravenous sedation, we ask that you please arrive 30 minutes prior to the exam start time. 
IF YOU ARE RECEIVING SEDATION, PLEASE HAVE SOMEONE PRESENT WITH YOU TO DRIVE YOU HOME AFTER YOUR APPOINTMENT.

Forms to Bring
Please make sure to bring your insurance card and your exam prescription from your referring doctor to your appointment.

Prior Films
If you have had an imaging study (Xray, ultrasound, bone scan, mammograms, MRI, or CT) of the body part being imaged, please bring all pertinent films with any available reports to our office at the time of your appointment. Depending on what films you bring and their relevance to your exam, you may either take your films when you leave or return at a later time for pick-up.

How to Dress
You may wear regular clothes or street clothes to your appointment, however, all metal objects will have to be removed due to image artifacts.

Some athleticwear such as Lululemon and other types of athleticwear may contain metal and should not be worn. You will be provided with a gown if your clothes are not compatible with the scanner.

Before your MRI begins you will be directed to a changing room with a locker where you can store your clothes and personal belongings.

What to Eat
Certain types of exams may require the patient to fast prior to their imaging. The duration and type of fasting may vary based on the type of exam.

During your scheduling call with our office, you will be advised of any fasting requirements for your scan.

What to Expect – MRI

MRI uses a magnetic field in combination with radiowaves to create images of the body. The patient lies on a movable table, which is positioned so that the body part being examined is placed in the center of a doughnut-like cylinder.

The patient will be given ear plugs and has the option of listening to music during the exam, which usually lasts between 15 and 30 minutes.
A series of loud knocks will be heard during the MRI because of the machinery adjusting the magnetic field and radiowaves to obtain the best possible images.

Typically, the MRI exam will be made up of between 5 and 10 types of images, each taking between 2 and 5 minutes to obtain. The patient will need to remain motionless during each of these image acquisitions. A small break of a few seconds will be given in between image acquisitions, but the table cannot be repositioned until the end of the exam.

Once the examination is completed, the patient is free to leave. The images are then sent digitally to a subspecialty-trained radiologist for interpretation. The results are then delivered and/or faxed to your referring doctor the same day or the following morning. If it is an urgent case, you will be escorted to the waiting room, while our radiologist discusses the findings of the case with your referring doctor, who will then decide the next plan of treatment.

What to Expect – CT

A CT Scanner uses an x-ray that rotates around a donut shaped cylinder called a gantry. The patient lies on a movable table, which is positioned so that the body part being examined is placed in the center of a thin doughnut-like cylinder.

As the table slowly moves through the CT scanner, the x-ray tube rotates around the patient to create very thin images of the body, called slices. These slices can be displayed individually or stacked together to create a 3D image.

A CT scan is a relatively quick procedure and unlike MRI, it does not involve loud noises. Therefore earplugs are not necessary. A CT scan typically takes between 5 and 10 minutes, although certain scans could take a long as 30 minutes.

Once the examination is completed, the patient is free to leave. The images are then sent digitally to a subspecialty-trained radiologist for interpretation. The results are then delivered and/or faxed to your referring doctor the same day or the following morning. If it is an urgent case, you will be escorted to the waiting room, while our radiologist discusses the findings of the case with your referring doctor, who will then decide the next plan of treatment.